Home Watch Types Automatic The Manchester Watch Works Equinox has hit the starting line

The Manchester Watch Works Equinox has hit the starting line

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We have been covering the releases from Manchester Watch Works since they first hit the crowd-funding scene.  Each one has been something interesting, so I was interested when I saw a new email come in from the brand announcing their latest model.  The Manchester Watch Works Equinox series just went live on Kickstarter today.

As you likely already noticed, the Manchester Watch Works Equinox is not your typical round case.  No, they’ve actually got dimensions here that pretty closely mimic those of a rather popular smartwatch these days (the Apple Watch).  So, while the steel case comes in at 37mm x 43mm (and just under 12mm thick), it presents with a much different profile than that watch from Apple.

While I would not go so far as to call the Manchester Watch Works Equinox as chunky watch, it definitely has some angular presence to it, with the wider bezel around the crystal.  Fortunately, it seems like the case profile has been kept relatively low (if you exclude the case back, thickness comes in closer to 10mm), which will give things a sleeker look from the sides.

When it comes to watches on Kickstarter, it is often no surprise at all to find something from Miyota powering the watch.  MWW is upping the game a bit though, going full-Swiss for their models (well, the movements).  With the chronograph (which certainly carries that vintage racer vibe in the case shape), you have a Swiss Ronda 5010.B quartz movement driving things.  For the automatic, there’s a newer one that we’re starting to see more of, the STP 1-11.  I’ve not played around with a watch with this movement, so I cannot speak to it specifically; we’ll just have to trust in that Swiss-made labelling until someone more knowledgeable on the movement chimes in below.

Even with those Swiss movements, pricing for the Manchester Watch Works Equinox is kept very modest.  For the chronograph, early bird pricing starts at $200, with the automatic starting off at the $300 price point.  For this sort of a unique design, along with the Swiss movements, frankly, the pricing seems like quite a deal.  We’ll see of course about getting a prototype in for review; in the meantime, you can check out the project page here.  As I mentioned, the project just opened today, with funding closing out on March 7, 2017.  manchesterwatchworks.com

Watch Overview
  • Brand & Model:  Manchester Watch Works Equinox
  • Price: Earlybird pricing starts at $200 for the chronograph and $300 for the automatic
  • Who we think it might be for: You’re on the hunt for a watch, you want a Swiss movement, and you really do not want to pick up another round-cased watch
  • Would I buy one for myself based on what I’ve seen?: Tough call – for me, personally, I want to see how that case shape wears on the wrist
  • If I could make one design suggestion, it would be: I’d see if the bezel and overall case thickness could be reduced any further
  • What spoke to me the most about this watch: Initially, it was the case shape alone, but further review pulled the dial into the mix as well
Tech Specs from Manchester Watch Works
  • Movement
    • Swiss automatic STP 1-11:  (hours, minutes, sweep second, date, rapid corrector, stop second device, self-winding mechanism with ball bearing, 28,800 vibrations per hour, 26 jewels, Power reserve 44 hours)
    • Swiss Ronda 5010.B quartz chronograph movement (10 jewels, 54 month battery, center stop second [1/1 sec] , 30 minute / 12 hour counter, ADD and SPLIT functions)
  • Case:  316L Stainless steel; 37mm x 43mm; 11.8mm thick
  • Dial:
    • Sunray finish on automatic dial
    • Chronos have sunday finish only on the subdial
    • BGW9 lume
    • Crystal:
      • Beveled sapphire with AR coating
      • Automatic version also has a mineral crystal on the caseback
    • WR:  100m
    • Strap:  20mm; H-link brushed steel bracelet plus a carbon fiber-patterned leather strap

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