Home General How About a “Recycled” Watch?

How About a “Recycled” Watch?

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If you recall from my prior post on the Archer Aero II, you’ll know that I quickly became a fan of the watch, and the service that the owner, Al, offers.  And, at first glance, you might wonder why I’m featuring this pilot watch, as it’s not displaying any of the uniqueness that Iwas so fond of with the Aero II.

This watch is part of Archer’s Vintage collection.  Where other brands may simply take that to mean “inspired by vintage watches”, Al is actually going a step further.  He’s giving an extensive overhaul to one of three different Hamilton movements (917, 921, or 945), complete with the full documentation he provides with all his work.  I like this primarily for two reasons:

  1. It’s putting a classic, and still fully functional, movement back into service, rather than relegating it to the scrap heap of history
  2. You’re getting “North American” watch, with American movement and Canadian manufacture

Of course, it also helps that this is another visually stunning (and clean) watch.  You have a 42mm stainless steel case (11mm thick) with a bead-blasted finish, with sapphire crystals in the front and back (the front crystal has AR coating).  The large crown should make for easy winding, and you have your choice of black or brown leather straps to have slipped in between the 22mm lugs.  Oh!  And the whole thing is WR to 50m, so your vintage movement is well protected.

Pricing isn’t as straightforward on these, as I imagine that it’s rather dependent on which of three movements you would want included in the watch.  However, drop a line to Al (the contact info is on the Vintage page), and you should be able to get the ball rolling pretty easily.

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5 COMMENTS

  1. […] While the Armand Nicolet L15 is a nice-looking three-hander with date, at first you might think that there is not much that sets the watch apart – so what made it interesting to me? By the very fact that it is part of their O.H.M. (Original Historical Movement) collection. What that acronym indicates is that they found a cache of old movements (in this case an AS 1883 which was made in 1967), which are then restored and re-assembled in the current workshop. This, along with some modifications they made in 2014, results in the movement carrying the designation AN703A. Whatever the nomenclature, I am just happy to see an old movement get new life breathed into it, rather than being disassembled and melted for scrap – much like we see with our friends over at Archer Watch. […]

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